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IPEK AZIME
CELIK RAPPAS

Sciences of information and communication - Turkey

Contact details

Research topics

PROJECT

Instant Throw-Away Europe: Producing Space and Value on Screen

This project locates film and TV industry at the epicenter of urban regeneration activity in post-industrial Europe. Based on the analysis of trade magazines and interviews with film commissions, residents and media workers in a range of post-industrial European sites in Belfast, Berlin, Istanbul, Marseille, and Paris, it explores how both screen images and production of images initiate a location’s conversion from industrial to creative value. Film and TV industry’s constant pursuit of undiscovered and affordable locations for production aligns well with municipal urban branding efforts. This project explores the advantages that mobile and temporary screen economy has over other creative industries in entering into post-industrial areas and initiating regeneration.

Activities / Resume

BIOGRAPHY

Ipek A. Çelik Rappas is an Assistant Professor of Media and Visual Arts at Koç University, Istanbul. She has a background in Political Science (BA, Bogazici University, Istanbul), in Cultural Studies (MA, The Ohio State University), and in Comparative Literature (MA and PhD, New York University). Before her current job, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Cogut Center for the Humanities at Brown University and Assistant Professor in Cultures, Civilizations and Ideas at Bilkent University (Ankara).

Her interdisciplinary research interests lie in migration and ethnicity, urban studies and media industry studies. Her current work seeks to integrate insights from ethnographic research in media production and urban studies into cinema and television studies. Her book In Permanent Crisis : Ethnicity in European Media and Cinema has been published by University of Michigan Press in 2015. Her work has also been published in film and media journals including Cinema Journal, Continuum, Television and New Media and Studies in European Cinema.
 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOK

In Permanent Crisis: Ethnicity in European Media and Cinema (University of Michigan Press, 2015)

ARTICLES

  • With Stefano Baschiera, “Fabricating “Cool” Heritage for Northern Ireland: Game of Thrones Tourism,” The Journal of Popular Culture, forthcoming in 2020.
  • With Phillip Phillis, ““Do the Right Thing’: Encounters with Undocumented Migrants in Contemporary European Cinema,” Studies in European Cinema, 17/1 (2020): 36-50.
  • “From Titanic to Game of Thrones: Promoting Belfast as a Global Media Capital,”
  • Media, Culture and Society, 2019, 41/4 (2019): 539-556.
  • With Ozlem Koksal, “A Hand that Holds a Machete: Race and the Representation of the Displaced in Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan,” 2019, Third Text, 33/2 (2019): 256-267.
  • “Tracing a history of terrorism in Rachid Bouchareb’s films: London River (2009), Hors la loi (2010) and La Route d’Istanbul (2016),” Studies in French Cinema, 19/ 3 (2018): 179-193.
  • With Sezen Kayhan, “TV Series Production and the Urban Restructuring of Istanbul,” Television and New Media 19/1 (2018): 3-23.
  • “Refugees as Innocent Bodies, Directors as Political Activists: Humanitarianism and Compassion in European Cinema,” Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios sobre Cuerpos, Emociones y Sociedad 23/9 (2017): 81-89.
  • “The Urban Renovation of Marseille in Luc Besson’s Taxi series,” French Cultural Studies 27/4 (2016): 385-397.
  • “Corporeal Violence in Art-House Cinema: Cannes 2009,” Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies 30/6 (2016): 670-678.
  • “Internal Borders in Yorgos Lanthimos’s Dogtooth (Kynodontas-2009)” in Frontiers of Screen History: Imagining European Borders in Cinema, 1945-2010, eds. Raita Merivirta, Kimmo Ahonen, Heta Mulari and Rami Mähkä (Bristol: Intellect, 2013): 217-234.
  • “Performing Veiled Women as Marketable Commodities: Representations of Muslim Minority Women in Germany,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 32/1 (2012): 116-129.
  • “‘I Wanted You to Be Present’: Guilt and History of Violence in Michael Haneke’s Hidden,” Cinema Journal 50/1 (2010): 59-80.